Et toujours...

ROLLINS

xxxx

WEST

NO

LESTER

LADIES

ETHEL

PARKER

BESSIE

BE BOP

DJANGO

GRAPPELLI

CHARBONNEL

SLIM

SLIM

MA

LIL

DINAH

CHAMPION

Big Joe WILLIAMS Agrandir

Big Joe WILLIAMS

1 CD - 22 TITRES / THE GIANT OF THE 9 STRINGS GUITAR
EPM Blues collection

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R410

8,00 €

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Artiste
Big Joe WILLIAMS
Type de musique
JAZZ
Big Joe WILLIAMS

1 - Little leg woman
2 - Providence help the poor people
3 - 49 highway blues
4 - Stepfather blues
5 - Baby please don't go
6 - Wild cow blues
7 - Stack o' dollars
8 - I know you gonna to miss me
9 - Brother James. Rootin' ground hog
10 - Rootin' ground hog
11 - I won'y be in hard luck no more
12 - Meet me around the corner
13 - Crawlin' king snake
14 - I'm getting wild about her
15 - Peach orchard mama
16 - Please don(t go
17 - Break '"m on down
18 - Highway 49
19 - Someday baby
20 - His spirit lives on
21 - Vitamin A
22 - Somebody's been worryin'

Big Joe Williams' famous nine-string guitar did has much for his renown as his music. Big Joe probably did not have an instant and final revelation of this unique, original instrument he himself built. It was rather the result of trials and errors, of successive adaptations  motivated by the evolution of his music. It is probable that he first added a seventh string, then another one - the picture on the CD backcover, from a Bluebird advertisment, shows an eight-string guitar (with only the high-pitched doubled), which he curiously holds on the left side in front of the camera.
As of his rediscovery, Big Joe was always featured with a nine-string guitar. After the AFBF show  in Paris in 1968, Benoit Leroux, in the magazine 'Jazz Hot', described this famous guitar so : 'an old Supertone patched up with chatterton, band-aid and wire, a loose microphone plugged God-knows-how and three extra keys fixed to the top of the neck '. The guitar is tuned in G, in the following order : D (doubled to the unisson) - B (id) - G - D (doubled one octave higher) - G - D. (7) In later tours, Big Joe Williams was mistreating another guitar model, just as old and worn out. Finally, the photos of a concert in Holland in 1973 show him playing a "real" twelve string guitar ! To set out with one string and end up with twelve, isn't this the sign of an extraordinary life?
 
Translated by Dominique Bach
 
(1) quack remedy sellers used to employ musicians to play in parades and attract audiences.
(2) in his very large discography,  the traditional variety repertoire has little space.
(3) see St Louis Blues (EPM/Blues Collection 158392)
(4) the exact truth on these pseudo or real recordings never came out of Williams' own mouth : like many of his fellow musicians rediscovered in the 50s/60s, he enjoyed giving the young amateurs of that time tales to swallow. In that way, he would have recorded as early as 1921 in New Orleans (when there never was any session in that town at that time!), and, ten years later, in Grafton (Wisconsin), under the pseudonym King Solomon Hill. It was discovered later that the King Solomon in question was probably called Joe Holmes.
(5) During the same session, two tracks were recorded under the name Chasey Collins, supposedly the band's violin player. But upon listening, it seems dubious that the same man can sing while playing with such fierceness the unique string of his instrument. In which case the singer would be by washboard player, by the name of … Chasey Collins (Q.E.D. with no commitment!)


 

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